CFP: Historical Geographies of Home: domestic space and practice in the past

Historical Geographies of Home: domestic space and practice in the past

Session for the 16th International Conference of Historical Geographers (5 – 10 July 2015)

The Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers), London

Session convenors:

Alison Blunt (Queen Mary, University of London)

Eleanor John (The Geffrye Museum of the Home)

Alastair Owens (Queen Mary, University of London)

Centre for Studies of Home: www.studiesofhome.qmul.ac.uk

Convened by the Centre for Studies of Home, a partnership between Queen Mary, University of London and The Geffrye Museum of the Home, this session will draw on diverse historical sources and methods to explore domestic space and practice in the past. It will span home-making on a domestic scale (including everyday domestic life, domestic architecture, interior design and domestic material cultures) to the significance of home beyond the domestic (including broader ideas about dwelling, belonging and security). Bringing together papers about homes in different places and at different times, the session will also highlight collaborative work between academics, curators and other colleagues working in the arts, cultural and heritage sectors. The session will be followed by a field trip to The Geffrye Museum of the Home on 8 July 2015.

Papers are particularly invited that relate to the following themes:

  • Domestic materialities in the past
  • Past homes and the wider world
  • Spaces and practices within the domestic interior
  • Home-making, mobility and migration
  • Paid and unpaid domestic work
  • Home, memory and the lifecourse
  • The spatial politics of home
  • Home and heritage
  • Curating past homes

Please send abstracts of 200 words to Jacqueline Winston-Silk (JWinston-Silk@geffrye-museum.org.uk) by Friday 11 July 2014.  For more information about the conference, see: www.ichg2015.org/

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